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Per Terra ad astra

Per aspera Terra ad astra (This is Latin. Don’t google it, go through the text and at the end you will understand the meaning.) Maria Magliulo (University of Essex) I don’t know the story behind this cartoon [2], nor the intention of the artist. I found it by chance. It made me think that, despite … Continue reading Per Terra ad astra

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A call for questions! The answers are out there, finding the questions is the actual problem

Author: Ronja Ebner - "42?" -"I checked it very thoroughly," said the computer, "and that quite definitely is the answer. I think the problem, to be quite honest with you, is that you've never actually known what the question is". [1] The question implied this simple picture is probably known to everybody without further need … Continue reading A call for questions! The answers are out there, finding the questions is the actual problem

On the whisky contribution to climate change study

Author: Laetitia Guibourdenche (Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris) Winter 1957. Charcot Base. Adelia Land. Antarctica. 2400m above sea level. Charcot Base (1957). Arrival of Lorius’s Team. Source of all images: http://www.claude-lorius.com/ Claude Lorius, a young glaciologist and his colleagues, spent 10 months in the Charcot Base, trying to unravel the secrets of the … Continue reading On the whisky contribution to climate change study

Disappearance and appearance of seas: from the Alpine Tethys to the Paratethys and its link with the Messinian Salinity Crisis

Author: Federico Andreeto - Utrecht University (Neetherlands) Can a sea disappear? No one would answer; that a sea could disappear would seem science fiction. On the other hand, if we could travel back tens or hundreds of millions of years, moving towards the most remote ages, we would be amazed to find a planet so … Continue reading Disappearance and appearance of seas: from the Alpine Tethys to the Paratethys and its link with the Messinian Salinity Crisis

Writing Clearly and Concisely! A Lesson from the Father of Geology

Fadl Raad - Université de Montpellier (France) In 1770, wandering around his farm in eastern Scotland, James Hutton, today known to be the father of geology, noticed that the soil in his farm was being created from the erosion of the surrounding rocks and subsequently washed and carried away by rain, streams and rivers and … Continue reading Writing Clearly and Concisely! A Lesson from the Father of Geology

Beyond the Scala dei Turchi: A stairway from the Messinian to the Zanclean

Athina Tzevahirtzian - Universitá degli Studi di Palermo (Italy) Scala dei Turchi or “Stairs of the Turks” is one of the most popular Mediterranean destinations located on the southern coast of Sicily, in the area of Capo Rossello. Its attraction grew through the legend of these unusual staircases, also revealed by its name, referring to … Continue reading Beyond the Scala dei Turchi: A stairway from the Messinian to the Zanclean

Mente et Malleo, (et Computatrum)

Author: Hanneke Heida - Institut de Ciències de la Terra Jaume Almera (CSIC) (Barcelona - Spain) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q___eADYvJM Source: Garcia-Castellanos et al. (2003). ‘Mente et malleo’ (Mind and hammer) is written on the souvenir plates me and my fellow students received at the end of our first geological fieldwork. After four weeks traversing the hills around … Continue reading Mente et Malleo, (et Computatrum)